Books



1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 3 hours ago (via andrewgelman.com)
All this discussion of plagiarism is leaving a bad taste in my mouth (or, I guess I should say, a bad feeling in my fingers, given that I’m expressing all this on the keyboard) so I wanted to close off the workweek with something more interesting. I happened to come across the above-titled paper by […] The post The Use of Sampling Weights in Bayesian Hierarchical Models for Small Area ...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 3 hours ago (via andrewgelman.com)
Basbøll has another post regarding some copying-without-attribution by the somewhat-famous academic entertainer Slavoj Zizek. In his post, Basbøll links to theologian and professor Adam Kotsko (cool: who knew there were still theologians out and about in academia?) who defends Zizek, in part on the grounds that Zizek’s critics were being too harsh. Kotsko writes of […] The post Defen...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 3 hours ago (via andrewgelman.com)
Alan Sokal writes: We know perfectly well that our politicians (or at least some of them) lie to us; we take it for granted; we are inured to it. And that may be precisely the problem. Perhaps we have become so inured to political lies — so hard-headedly cynical — that we have lost our […] The post Sokal: “science is not merely a bag of clever tricks . . . Rather, the natural scie...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 1 day ago (via andrewgelman.com)
Boolean models (“it’s either A or (B and C)”) seem to be the natural way that we think, but additive models (“10 points if you have A, 3 points if you have B, 2 points if you have C”) seem to describe reality better—at least, the aspects of reality that I study in my research. […] The post Message to Booleans: It’s an additive world, we just live in...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 1 day ago (via math-frolic.blogspot.com)
We live in a day of extraordinary and over-riding science specialization.... H/T to Jordan Ellenberg for pointing to this post about an obituary for Alexander Grothendieck that was rejected by Nature -- a fascinating read, even if Nature didn't find it so for their obit. purposes. David Mumford, one of the authors, finds it "very depressing" that a STEM publication would judge this piece unsuitabl...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 1 day ago (via blog.computationalcomplexity.org)
The NIPS (machine learning) conference ran an interesting experiment this year. They had two separate and disjoint program committees with the submissions split between them. 10% (166) of the submissions were given to both committees. If either committee accepted one of those papers it was accepted to NIPS. According to an analysis by Eric Price, of those 166, about 16 (about 10%) were accept...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 1 day ago (via flowingdata.com)
I'm pretty sure there's a ton of untapped potential in data represented physically. Maybe not in the analytical insights sense …Tags: physical...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 1 day ago (via flowingdata.com)
It's always tough to pick my favorite visualization projects. I mean, it's a challenge to pick and rank your favorite anything really. So much depends on what you feel like at the time, and there's a lot of good work out there. Nevertheless, I gave it a go. Tags: best-of...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 2 days ago (via hilbertthm90.wordpress.com)
Today I’d like to give a fairly simple account of why Uncertainty Principles exist in quantum mechanics. I thought I already did this post, but I can’t find it now. I often see in movies and sci-fi books (not to … Continue reading →...
1
digs
Permanent link - Posted 2 days ago (via andrewgelman.com)
(scheduled to appear in a few months, of course). I think you’ll like it. Or hate it. Depending on who you are. The post Hey, I just wrote my April Fool’s post! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science. ...
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 Next